Conservation of Konark Sun Temple

News: Several steps have   been taken by Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) to mitigate the impact of   saline action, water logging, erosion and vegetative intrusions such as cleaning of the surface by paper pulp method, consolidation and strengthening of   stones wherever needed, plantation of trees in surrounding area to prevent   mechanical erosion by wind action, removal of water by installing pumping sets,   and periodic biocidal treatment for control of vegetative intrusion.   Conservation work of monuments, including Sun Temple, Konark is a continuous   process and the said monument, also a World Heritage Site, is in a good state   of preservation due to regular care by ASI.

Konark Temple

  • Konark Sun Temple, located in the East Odisha near the sacred city of Puri.
  • Built in 13thcentury by King Narasimhadeva I (AD 1238-1264). Its scale, refinement and conception represent the strength and stability of the Ganga Empire as well as the value systems of the historic milieu.
  • The temple is designed in the shape of a colossal chariot. It is dedicated to the sun God. In this sense, it is directly and materially linked to Brahmanism and tantric belief systems.
  • The Konark temple is widely known not only for its architectural grandeur but also for the intricacy and profusion of sculptural work.
  • It marks the highest point of achievement of Kalinga architecture depicting the grace, the joy and the rhythm of life all its wondrous variety. It was declared a UNESCO world heritage site in 1984.
  • There are two rows of 12 wheels on each side of the Konark sun temple. Some say the wheels represent the 24 hours in a day and others say the 12 months. The seven horses are said to symbolize the seven days of the week.
  • Sailors once called this Sun Temple of Konark, the Black Pagoda because it was supposed to draw ships into the shore and cause shipwrecks.
  • Konârak is the invaluable link in the history of the diffusion of the cult of Surya, which originating in Kashmir during the 8th century, finally reached the shores of Eastern India.